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27 July, 2016

A new paper rejects claims that drainage of peatlands for plantations can be sustainable

In 2015 Indonesia was hit by a disastrous haze event caused by extensive peatland fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan. In response, the Indonesian government launched a national Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG) with an ambitious target of restoring over 2 million hectares of peatlands by 2020. Success will depend on a proper understanding of the functioning of peatlands. A new policy brief by Wetlands International and Tropenbos International calls for a thorough science-based approach, instead of some of the currently widely applied policies and management models, which have insufficiently considered the issue of peatland subsidence.

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08 July, 2016

The potential of the High Conservation Value concept as basis for landscape conservation planning

A research at the Pawan River watershed to assess the potential of the HCV concept to provide the basis of landscape conservation planning was developed in mid - 2015. The Pawan watershed was chosen because it is representative of those areas in Indonesia that have experienced extensive changes in land cover, and because HCV activities have taken place there. The watershed provides an appropriate site to study the gap between potential and actual HCVs. This gap — and the high proportion of potential HCVs that are managed by the private sector — indicates a high risk of losing HCVs.

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08 July, 2016

Forest Investment Programme to supply free tree seedlings to tree growers in Ghana

Tree seedlings will be supplied free of charge to tree growers in the Brong-Ahafo and Western Regions by the Forest Investment Programme (FIP) to boost plantation development in Ghana under a five-year pilot programme which begun last year.

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07 July, 2016

Facing climate change in the páramos in Colombia

Páramos are endemic ecosystems in the northern part of the Andes, found only in the high mountains of Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Venezuela and Costa Rica. They are strategic due to their floral and faunal diversity and because of the ecosystem services they provide, including carbon sequestration in the soil and water regulation that benefits almost 70% of the inhabitants of Colombia.

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